FORAGING

Collecting Foliage

The bleakness of winter is often mirrored in the natural environment, skeletal trees and cold pale skies stretching out across the seemingly desolate landscape. Look beyond, there is so much flourishing in our woodlands and along country lanes to gather and bring nature inside.



Evergreens have, of course, been there throughout the whole year, a staid backdrop to the vibrancy of summer. But, it is when all else has perished or become dormant during the winter months that these rich green beauties really become the star attraction in the countryside, many of them bursting with glistening jewels of red and purple berries as winter approaches.

Snip sprigs of berried Holly and Yew, pine scented Fir and fragrant Juniper and Eucalyptus to tuck behind picture frames or festoon a mantlepiece. Gather natural garlands of trailing Ivy and Winter Jasmine. Pay mind to the shadowy corners for the delicate branches of the Snowberry and look skyward for Mistletoe nestled in the higher reaches of a tree which might require a long stick to knock it down!


Snip branches of Crabapples, Sloe berries, Hawthorns and Rose hips, the fruits of which not only make delicious jellies or syrups, but look spectacular gathered together in a vase. Look to the ground for fallen treasures.

Tree branches covered in moss or lichen can add a dramatic touch to a table centerpiece and pine cones and sweet chestnuts make simple decorative touches to a shelf or nook. The rustic golden tones of dried bracken, seed heads and dried grasses make delicate posies and everlasting wreaths for the wall.

 

In the early 1960s Robert Welch designed his first piece in cast iron, a candleholder he named Hobart. Cast iron was an important addition to Robert Welch's portfolio, complementing his designs in silver and steel. At first Hobart was produced in small numbers,

the initial order was only two dozen, but after displaying them in his studio and home the designs popularity grew and led to a second order of one-hundred. Robert sold the designs himself out of a suitcase for a year, and initial buyers included Liberty and Heals.

Evergreens have, of course, been there throughout the whole year, a staid backdrop to the vibrancy of summer. But, it is when all else has perished or become dormant during the winter months that these rich green beauties really become the star attraction in the countryside, many of them bursting with glistening jewels of red and purple berries as winter approaches.

Snip sprigs of berried Holly and Yew, pine scented Fir and fragrant Juniper and Eucalyptus to tuck behind picture frames or festoon a mantlepiece. Gather natural garlands of trailing Ivy and Winter Jasmine. Pay mind to the shadowy corners for the delicate branches of the Snowberry and look skyward for Mistletoe nestled in the higher reaches of a tree which might require a long stick to knock it down!



Snip branches of Crabapples, Sloe berries, Hawthorns and Rose hips, the fruits of which not only make delicious jellies or syrups, but look spectacular gathered together in a vase. Look to the ground for fallen treasures.

Tree branches covered in moss or lichen can add a dramatic touch to a table centerpiece and pine cones and sweet chestnuts make simple decorative touches to a shelf or nook. The rustic golden tones of dried bracken, seed heads and dried grasses make delicate posies and everlasting wreaths for the wall.