JOURNAL

HOW TO MAKE A WREATH

Christmas Foliage and Table Styling

Traditionally, decorative greenery gathered from the landscape around us welcomes those who visit at Christmas, forms the backdrop to the festive gatherings and parties we host, and becomes the centrepiece of the tables where we serve our winter feasts.

The bleakness during these darker months hardens the ground and what does remain stands out - often thick, richly evergreen, scented and berried.

Is it any wonder then that for centuries, humans have collected it? Creating our own cheered, sense of comfort that life does endure and will return come spring.

WREATH MAKING WORKSHOP

List of seasonal foliage:

•Ivy
• Spruce
• Leylandii
• Laurel
• Dwarf Ivy
•Rosemary

Add some faux or dried elements: the odd thistle, teasles, Amaranthus stems and wispy grasses, Lichen branches, birch, berries and seed heads for some alternative textures and shapes.

Finish with a decoration, tied at the top to hang in the centre.

Earlier this month, members of the Robert Welch team took part in a workshop to create Christmas wreaths and other decorative elements, such as bobeches and centrepieces suitable for a festive table.

Led by Soraya of the Feral Florist who focuses on using eco-friendly and sustainable materials, omitting elements such as wire from her designs.

We used 10-inch, sustainable, willow wreaths, an eclectic mix of festive foliage and eco-dyed velvet ribbon in burgundy or mint green. We began by building up the foliage, weaving the stems around and into the woven willow. To help secure larger handfuls of stems or heavier pieces we used garden string to tie the foliage into bunches before adding. Rattan or reusable willow wreaths look good partially exposed underneath the foliage, as well as if made into a full wreath.

Common evergreens are great for fresh vivid colour, often they grow in gardens and hedges and carry their beautiful fresh scents with them.

Seasonal foliage:

Ivy

Spruce

Leylandii

Laurel

Dwarf Ivy

Rosemary

Eucalyptus

Box

Add some faux or dried elements: the odd thistle, teasles, Amaranthus stems and wispy grasses, Lichen branches, birch, berries and seed heads for some alternative textures and shapes.

Finish with a Robert Welch Christmas decoration, tied at the top to hang in the centre.

Earlier this month, members of the Robert Welch team took part in a workshop to create Christmas wreaths and other decorative elements, such as bobeches and centrepieces suitable for a festive table.

Led by Soraya of the Feral Florist who focuses on using eco-friendly and sustainable materials, omitting elements such as wire from her designs.

We used 10-inch, sustainable, willow wreaths, an eclectic mix of festive foliage and eco-dyed velvet ribbon in burgundy or mint green. We began by building up the foliage, weaving the stems around and into the woven willow. To help secure larger handfuls of stems or heavier pieces we used garden string to tie the foliage into bunches before adding. Rattan or reusable willow wreaths look good partially exposed underneath the foliage, as well as if made into a full wreath.

Common evergreens are great for fresh vivid colour, often they grow in gardens and hedges and carry their beautiful fresh scents with them.

List of seasonal foliage:

• Ivy
• Spruce
• Leylandii
• Laurel
• Dwarf Ivy
• Rosemary

Add some faux or dried elements: the odd thistle, teasles, Amaranthus stems and wispy grasses, Lichen branches, birch, berries and seed heads for some alternative textures and shapes.

Finish with a decoration, tied at the top to hang in the centre.

“Look to the ground for fallen treasures. Tree branches covered in moss or lichen can add a dramatic touch to a table centrepiece and pine cones and sweet chestnuts make simple decorative touches to a shelf or nook. The rustic golden tones of dried bracken, seed heads and dried grasses make delicate posies and everlasting wreaths for the wall.”

Robert Welch Anthology, Christmas 2020. ‘Collecting Foliage’ Sarah Hemsley

List of seasonal foliage:

  • Ivy
  • Spruce
  • Leylandii
  • Laurel
  • Dwarf Ivy
  • Rosemary

Add some faux or dried elements: the odd thistle, teasles, Amaranthus stems and wispy grasses, Lichen branches, birch, berries and seed heads for some alternative textures and shapes.

Finish with a decoration, tied at the top to hang in the centre.

“Look to the ground for fallen treasures. Tree branches covered in moss or lichen can add a dramatic touch to a table centrepiece and pine cones and sweet chestnuts make simple decorative touches to a shelf or nook. The rustic golden tones of dried bracken, seed heads and dried grasses make delicate posies and everlasting wreaths for the wall.”

Robert Welch Anthology, Christmas 2020. ‘Collecting Foliage’ Sarah Hemsley

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